A.D.A. Compliant Websites Design and Development in San Juan

Ideally, everyone should be able to use any website on the internet. It shouldn’t matter if they have a condition that affects their capabilities or what hardware and software they need to use. This is the main tenet behind the concept of web accessibility.
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A Brief Introduction to Web Accessibility

The fact is that millions of internet users have special needs and impairments that can make it difficult or even impossible for them to use certain types of websites. By designing your site with these challenges in mind, you can ensure that it’s welcoming to as many users as possible.

While there are a lot of disabilities and conditions that can affect the way people use websites, let’s take a look at some of the most common categories of impairments:

Vision

This includes a partial or total inability to see or to perceive color contrasts.

Hearing

Some users have a reduced ability to hear.

Motor Skills

These are people with difficulty moving parts of their bodies, including making precise movements (such as when using a mouse).

Photosensitive seizures

Conditions such as epilepsy can cause seizures that are often triggered by flashing lights.

Cognitive disabilities

There are also many conditions that affect cognitive ability, such as dementia and dyslexia.

10 Ways to Make Your Website Accessible

What Does ADA Website Compliance Mean

1. Make Sure Your Site Is Keyboard-Friendly

This step is also the most important. Put simply: for a website to be accessible, it must work without the use of a mouse. This is because many assistive technologies rely on keyboard-only navigation. As such, it must be possible to use all of your site’s major features via a keyboard and nothing else. This includes accessing all pages, links, content, and so on.

2. Make Sure All Content Is Easily Accessible

In addition to making your site keyboard-friendly, you also need to ensure that all content on the page is actually accessible. While this is usually not a problem, it can be an issue when a page contains dynamic content.

3. Add Alt Text to All Images

Alt text (sometimes called alt attributes, alt descriptions, or alt tags) is also accessed by screen readers to ‘read’ the picture. You can therefore use this field to describe an image, giving context to users who would otherwise miss it.

4. Choose Your Colors Carefully

9% of men have some form of colorblindness.  We should think about this when designing a site!

5. Use Headers to Structure Your Content Correctly

Another key task to make your site accessible is structuring your content by using headers carefully. Doing this will make your content much easier to understand and digest and improves flow.

6. Design Your Forms for Accessibility

Forms are a useful addition to most sites but must be designed carefully. What’s most important is to ensure that each field is clearly labeled. You should also aim to place the labels adjacent to the respective fields. While a sighted user can easily match a label to the corresponding field or option, this may not be obvious for someone using a screen reader.

7. Don’t Use Tables for Anything Except Tabular Data

When it comes to displaying data, tables are handy. They make it much easier for all users, including those using assistive technology, to parse a large amount of data. To get the maximum benefit, however, you’ll want to keep your tables as simple as you can.

8. Enable Resizable Text That Doesn’t Break Your Site

Most devices and browsers will enable users to resize text, which can be helpful for those with visual impairments. However, if you don’t build your site to support this feature, resizing text could break your design or make it difficult to interact with your site.

9. Avoid Automatic Media and Navigation

Automatically-playing media files have been a bane of internet users since the days of MySpace. As annoying as it can be to have music or videos start when a page loads, this is an even bigger issue in terms of accessibility.

10. Create Content With Accessibility in Mind

Finally, we come to the core of your site: its content. While designing your site for accessibility is hugely important, you should bear the same considerations in mind when creating content.

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Accessible Website Design in San Juan

Making sure your site is welcoming to as many people as possible should be a top priority. There’s no reason to exclude anybody, especially since it’s relatively easy to avoid doing so. Not only will your users thank you, but you’ll also likely see benefits in the form of increased traffic and conversions.

By taking the time to understand the possible flaws in your design and content, you can make sure your site is optimized for accessibility today.

ADA Compliance

Information About San Juan

The city is known historically for the site of the first battle of the Katipunan, the organization which led the 1896 Philippine Revolution against the Spanish Empire. Notable landmarks today such as Pinaglabanan Shrine and heritage homes are located in the city. Other locations include Greenhills and Santolan Town Plaza, making the city a major shopping hub with a range of upscale, boutique and bargain retail. Before the Spaniards came, San Juan was just a village and was part of the Kingdom of Namayan and ruled by King Lacantagean and his wife Bouan. When the Spaniards took possession of the kingdom, they renamed it to Sta. Ana de Sapa, the village was still a part of it but became a small encomienda by 1590. The first battle of the Philippine Revolution that achieved independence from Spain, began in San Juan in 1898. On June 16, 2007, voters in San Juan ratified the conversion of the municipality into a highly urbanised city, pursuant to Republic Act No. 9388 (“An Act Converting the Municipality of San Juan into a Highly Urbanized City to be known as the City of San Juan”). Then congressman Ronaldo B. Zamora sponsored the Cityhood Bill at the House of Representatives and worked for its approval. During the pre-Hispanic period, the village of what is now San Juan was a part of the Kingdom of Namayan, whose last recorded rulers were King Lacantagean and his wife Bouan. When the Spanish first took over the kingdom which they re-christened as Sta. Ana de Sapa, the village remained a part of it, re-classified as a barrio, and became a small encomienda by 1590. In 1602, the Dominican friars built a retreat house for their immediate use, where aging or convalescing friars stayed. Later, the Dominicans constructed a convent and a stone church dedicated to the Holy Cross. To this day, the thrice-rebuilt church of Santo Cristo stands on the same site, adjacent to the Aquinas School and the Dominican College. In 1783, San Juan became independent of Santa Ana but it was still then a barrio. The first battle of the Philippine Revolution that achieved independence from Spain began in San Juan in 1898. Although not officially designated as such, the city of San Juan could also be called the "Town of Philippine Presidents." Of the last nine presidents since the country became a republic in 1946, four of them were official residents of San Juan when they assumed office. They were the Macapagal father and daughter, Diosdado Sr. (1961–1965) and his daughter Gloria (2001–2010); Ferdinand Marcos (1965–1986); and Joseph Estrada (1998–2001), who also served as mayor when San Juan was still a municipality. On June 16, 2007, voters in San Juan ratified the conversion of the municipality into a highly urbanized city, pursuant to Republic Act No. 9388 ("An Act Converting the Municipality of San Juan into a Highly Urbanized City to be known as the City of San Juan"). Then congressman Ronaldo B. Zamora sponsored the Cityhood Bill at the House of Representatives and worked for its approval.

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ADA Compliant Website Accessibility

 

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